Monday, December 13, 2010

George Harrison electronic sound 2



George Harrison "Electronic Sound 2"


Electronic Sound is George Harrison's second solo album, and the second and final record released on the Beatles' short-lived Zapple Records (an offshoot of Apple Records), before it was folded at the insistence of The Beatles' then-manager Allen Klein. Released in May 1969, it features two lengthy pieces - one per side on the original vinyl release - performed on the Moog synthesizer.

The album was issued on CD for the first time in late 1996.

George Harrison electronic sound 1



George Harrison "Electronic Sound 1"


Electronic Sound is George Harrison's second solo album, and the second and final record released on the Beatles' short-lived Zapple Records (an offshoot of Apple Records), before it was folded at the insistence of The Beatles' then-manager Allen Klein. Released in May 1969, it features two lengthy pieces - one per side on the original vinyl release - performed on the Moog synthesizer.

Portions of white noise from "No Time or Space" are used throughout "I Remember Jeep", one of several jams included on Harrison's third solo album, All Things Must Pass, released in 1970.

The cover of Electronic Sound was painted by Harrison himself. The inside sleeve included minimal notes on the album, and a quote, attributed to an 'Arthur Wax': "There are a lot of people around, making a lot of noise; here's some more."

Due to its experimental and highly uncommercial nature, Electronic Sound failed to chart in the UK, and barely made the US Billboard album chart, peaking at #191.

Synthesist Bernie Krause later pursued legal action against Harrison, claiming side two of the record was essentially him demonstrating the Moog III to Harrison (as detailed in his book Into A Wild Sanctuary). Krause's name was originally featured on the front cover just under Harrison's, but was painted over in silver at Krause's insistence just before release.

The album was issued on CD for the first time in late 1996.

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Beaver and Krause changes



Paul Beaver and Bernard Krause "Changes"

Thursday, December 9, 2010

John Chowning stria



John Chowning "Stria" 1977

John M. Chowning is known for having discovered the FM synthesis algorithm in 1967. In FM (frequency modulation) synthesis, both the carrier frequency and the modulation frequency are within the audio band. In essence, the amplitude and frequency of one waveform modulates the frequency of another waveform producing a resultant waveform that can be periodic or non-periodic depending upon the ratio of the two frequencies.

Chowning's breakthrough allowed for simple yet rich sounding timbres, which synthesized 'metal striking' or 'bell like' sounds, and which seemed incredibly similar to real percussion. (Chowning was also a skilled drummer.)

He spent six years turning his breakthrough into a system of musical importance and eventually was able to simulate a large number of musical sounds, including the singing voice.

In 1973 Stanford University licensed the discovery to Yamaha in Japan, with whom Chowning worked in developing a family of synthesizers and electronic organs. This patent was Stanford's most lucrative patent at one time, eclipsing many in electronics, computer science, and biotechnology.

The first product to incorporate the FM algorithm was Yamaha's GS1, a digital synthesizer that first shipped in 1981. Some thought it too expensive at the time, Chowning included. Soon after, in 1983, Yamaha made their first commercially successful digital FM synthesizer, the DX7.

One of Chowning's most famous pieces is called Stria (1977). It was commissioned by IRCAM for the Institute's first major concert series called Perspectives of the 20th Century. His composition was noted for its inharmonic sounds due to his famous FM algorithm and his use of the Golden Mean (1.618...) in music. -Wikipedia

Wednesday, December 1, 2010

Beaver and Krause sequential voltage sources



Paul Beaver and Bernard Krause "Sequential Voltage Sources" (1968)